Pulsar Delay

André Michelle

The Pulsar Delay works much like the Delay but allows you low-pass the feedback and switch channels on every feedback cycle. The delay time can be adjusted in musical and absolute time for each stereo channel separately. This can be used to create interesting stereo effects (ping pong delay). The internal LFO can be applied to create flanger or chorus effects as well.

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    8yearale

    Hi, what does Millis do? Is it the similar as the 'Step' knob on the other delay?

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      Jordi Moragues

      Millis is short for milliseconds. They let you add an absolute time delay to the tempo-synced delay. You can do that globally or for each stereo channel separately using the corresponding controls.

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      8yearale

      and the millis on the left and right too =}

      thx

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    Nyenoidz [...]

    What exactly is the "Cross" knob and what does it control?

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      André Michelle

      The discussion was a long time ago on Facebook. However the cross is certainly not redundant. Without the cross parameter the channels would stay in place. Swapping the channels on every circle creates an interesting, more spatial effect. But the way it acts across its range is odd. It would have been better to have a linear range from min: no changes to the channels to max: swapping channels. However, it is not useless. You can have an effect where it starts very spatial while becoming centered (mono) with every circle (50%).

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      Jordi Moragues

      I don't really remember the design discussions. I just know that I've always had difficulty taming this device, especially tempo synced timing (how the Sync knobs interact) and stereo placement (Panning and Cross). The rest; LFO, filter, absolute timing is intuitive. It's great when one twiddles the knobs without looking for specific values and lets happy accidents happen, but when one needs a specific effect, I find it hard to get. I wonder if Cross is even necessary. One can already manipulate channel panning in the pre-delay section, and the concept of flipping what goes where in each feedback cycle seems redundant when each channel can have its own independent timing and panning settings. Anyway, as you said, maybe I just have difficulties wrapping my head around the concept.

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      André Michelle

      "If Cross is 0%, that means that the channels aren't being switched, is that right? "

      Yes. However, you rather exposed a conceptual issue with the device. It behaves exactly as we agreed on when we developed the device, but I see now, that 0% should rather leave the channels in place and not mix it down to mono. That would be a completely different behaviour and even would render the negative range of the cross parameter invalid (which inverts the signal phase). In other words, we cannot change it without breaking backwards-capability. The cross parameter behaves similar to the panorama device. Probably a bad decision back then.

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    Jordi Moragues

    I'm having a hard time understanding the relationship between Pre-Sync Time, Sync Time and Cross. What does each one do exactly and how do they interact? Thanks.

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      Jordi Moragues

      Thanks! I didn't know that. Setting the millis in the feedback delay to just 1 I could hear the Pre-Sync effect without using the main Sync time. The problem still remains that, as soon as you set the main Sync time (or millis) to anything else than 0/1, you always have a gap of silence equal to that time before you hear any delay, including that caused by Pre-Sync. It's like Sync time always overrides Pre-Sync time, despite how it's implemented. This makes it impossible to get common ping pong delay effects (for which I assumed the device was designed), where the delay between channels has to be half of the delay between ping pong cycles. I think it would be better to leave Pre-Sync time audible before Sync time acts. Sorry for missing the old Facebook discussion and bringing this issue so late. I hadn't really used the Pulsar much till now.

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      André Michelle

      No, the pre-delay is indeed before the feedback section. The reason why you are not hearing anything is that when sync-time and millis of the feedback delay is set to zero it basically mutes the delay-line (including the pre-delay). I remember discussing this behaviour in the Facebook group and we were aware of this edge-case. In short either sync-time or millis MUST have a value other than zero.

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      Jordi Moragues

      Thanks for the explanation. The way it's implemented, it sounds like the Pre-Sync values act -after- the main Sync time. For example, if the main Sync time is 0/1 (no delay) and the Pre-Sync times are different than 0/1, you still don't hear any changes in the incoming sound. I'd expect to hear the delays caused by the Pre section even if the feedback section isn't doing anything yet. Also, probably because of this, there are some delay effects that can't be achieved with this set up. For example, I can't achieve a common 1/16 ping pong delay. The closest I can get to it is one channel delayed 1/16 in respect to the other one, and then the whole thing repeated every 1/8 note in the feedback section (which sounds correct). But because the feedback section is set to 1/8, there's an initial gap between original sound and start of repeats of 1/8. Generally speaking, you can't get an initial delay shorter than the main Sync time. But often you need an initial delay equal to the shortest Pre-Sync time. That's why it seems that the Sync time is applied first, then the Pre-Sync times are added afterwards to it. Is this a bug or is it desired behaviour? I hope I'm making sense.

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    LEMD

    Thank you!!

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